Theseus Deeds – A Mythras Adventure in Bronze Age Greece (pt2)

Sinis

Theseus will rest through the night, recovering the last HP to heal his head injury. He has a Healing Rate of 3. For a Minor Wound such as his, this means 3 HP per day, which is just enough for 1 HP for 8 hours of rest. Then, he continues on to his path towards Athens.

map

Q: Is the scene as in the Myth?
A: No, and I will roll 1d10 on TWENE.
TWENE: 8: Remove major element.
So there two variations of the Myth. The most popular was that Sinis tied up his victims to two pine trees that he had bent, and then released them, the force of the pine tree cutting them in half. I will go with the other variation of the Myth, removing one of the two pine trees, which is a major element.

As Theseus continues on his path, he hears struggling. Walking towards the disturbance, he sees a man holding a huge branch of a pine tree. As the man notices Theseus he calls out to him.
“Help me stranger. I am trying to get this tree down to remove the pines. Will you lend a hand?” He asks pleading.

I consider this a Very Easy Insight roll, since Theseus knows about the man.
Theseus: Insight (98): 60: Success.

Theseus recalls Pittheus’ description of another robber. The man called Sinis (Σίνις), surnamed Pityokamptis (Πιτυοκάμπτης), the Pine-bender. He was known asking travelers to help him bend a pine tree. Then he released it, and the hapless victims were catapulted into the air, to their deaths.

Theseus will try to Deceit Sinis, into believing he has fallen to his ruse, and instead will release the pine-tree before him. This will require both a successful opposed DeceitInsight.

Theseus: Deceit (51): 73: Failure
Sinis: Insight (35): 78: Failure
Both fail their opposed roll. Repeat.
Theseus: Deceit (51): 32: Success
Sinis: Insight (35): 03: Critical Success
Sinis wins the opposed contest.
Q: Does he try to play along?
A: No, and he exposes Theseus directly
Note: It’s a pity story-wise, I wanted to pit them against each other, both holding the pine tree, but the Oracle has spoken.

“Certainly, let me help you with this tree.” Theseus tells Sinis, who notices Theseus still holding on to his iron club when approaching.
“Wouldn’t you want to put your armament to the side? We’re all just friends here, there’s no trouble in these parts.” Sinis tells Theseus, pointing at his sword and club.
Theseus doesn’t feel confident abandoning his gear next to such a vile man. He still holds his club, for far too long to give Sinis a reassuring answer. The two men look at each other, and Sinis lets of the pine tree, and picks a heavy branch.
“You think you’re stronger than me?” He taunts Theseus.
“Let’s find out”, Theseus responds and the two men face off.

Initiative:

Theseus: 17
Sinis: 18

Round 1:

Sinis Turn 1:

Sinis attacks Theseus, spending 1 AP. Theseus Parries spending 1 AP.
Sinis: Combat Style (67): 80: Failure.
Theseus: Combat Style (74): 63: Success. Theseus chooses Damage Weapon.
Damage: 2 vs AP 4: No Damage.

Theseus Turn 1:

Theseus attacks Sinis, spending 1 AP. Sinis Parries spending 1 AP.
Theseus: Combat Style (74): 35: Success.
Sinis: Combat Style (67): 01: Critical Success. Sinis chooses Blind Opponent. Theseus spends 1 Luck Point to have Sinis re-roll his attack.
Sinis: Combat Style (67): 11: Success. Sinis deflects all damage.

Sinis Turn 2:

Sinis attacks Theseus, spending 1 AP. Theseus Parries spending 1 AP.
Sinis: Combat Style (67): 07: Success.
Theseus: Combat Style (74): 87: Failure. Sinis chooses Stun Location.
Sinis: Location: 10: Chest: Damage: 1d6+1d2: 8 HP: Serious Wound. Theseus spends his last Luck Point to have Sinis re-roll damage. Damage: 1d6+1d2: 6 HP: Minor Wound.
Theseus: Endurance (43):22: Success. Theseus isn’t Stunned.

As Sinis attacks with his club, Theseus aims for the weapon and hits it. Iron is stronger than wood, but that piece of wood holds on and doesnt break. Theseus rebounds on the attack, but doesn’t manage to get past Sinis’ defense.
The pine-bender makes a quick strong attack right on Theseus’ chest, hurting him. Theseus coughs, but he holds on to his strength, not losing wind, staying in the fight.

Round 2:

Sinis Turn 1:

Sinis attacks Theseus, spending 1 AP. Theseus will only Parry re-actively. He intends to use the extra AP to gain the upper hand if required.
Sinis: Combat Style (67): 91: Failure.

Theseus Turn 1:

Theseus attacks Sinis, spending 1 AP. Sinis will only Parry re-actively. He intends to use the extra AP to gain the upper hand if required.
Theseus: Combat Style (74): 94: Failure.

Sinis Turn 2:

Sinis attacks Theseus, spending 1 AP. Theseus will only Parry re-actively. He intends to use the extra AP to gain the upper hand if required.
Sinis: Combat Style (67): 62: Success.
Theseus: Combat Style (74): 53: Success. Theseus deflects all damage.

Theseus Turn 2:

Theseus attacks Sinis, spending 1 AP. Sinis will only Parry re-actively. He intends to use the extra AP to gain the upper hand if required.
Theseus: Combat Style (74): 36: Success.
Sinis: Combat Style (67): 64: Success. Sinis deflects all damage.

The two combatants exchange blows, but they both parry successfully, locking at each other with their gaze as the fight continues.

Round 3:

Sinis Turn 1:

Sinis attacks Theseus, spending 1 AP. Theseus will only Parry re-actively. He intends to use the extra AP to gain the upper hand if required.
Sinis: Combat Style (67): 26: Success.
Theseus: Combat Style (74): 45: Success. Theseus deflects all damage.

Theseus Turn 1:

Theseus attacks Sinis, spending 1 AP. Sinis will only Parry re-actively. He intends to use the extra AP to gain the upper hand if required.
Theseus: Combat Style (74): 47: Success.
Sinis: Combat Style (67): 56: Success. Sinis deflects all damage.

Sinis Turn 2:

Sinis attacks Theseus, spending 1 AP. Theseus will only Parry re-actively. He intends to use the extra AP to gain the upper hand if required.
Sinis: Combat Style (67): 12: Success.
Theseus: Combat Style (74): 06: Critical Success! Theseus chooses Overextend Opponent.

Almost equal in skill, they don’t manage to get a hit, but finally, Theseus, calculates Sinis’ attack trajectory and steps aside just in the right moment for him to lose his balance.

Round 4:

Sinis Turn 1:

Sinis cannot attack this turn since he’s overextended.

Theseus Turn 1:

Theseus attacks Sinis, spending 1 AP. Sinis will only Parry re-actively. He intends to use the extra AP to gain the upper hand if required.
Theseus: Combat Style (74): 98: Failure.

Sinis Turn 2:

Sinis attacks Theseus, spending 1 AP. Theseus will only Parry re-actively. He intends to use the extra AP to gain the upper hand if required.
Sinis: Combat Style (67): 19: Success.
Theseus: Combat Style (74): 21: Success. Theseus deflects all damage.

Theseus Turn 2:

Theseus will delay, keeping his 1 AP for Parry.

Sinis Turn 3:

Sinis attacks Theseus, spending 1 AP. Theseus will only Parry re-actively. He intends to use the extra AP to gain the upper hand if required.
Sinis: Combat Style (67): 43: Success.
Theseus: Combat Style (74): 67: Success. Theseus deflects all damage.

Sinis Turn 4:

Sinis attacks Theseus, spending 1 AP. Theseus has no AP left.
Sinis: Combat Style (67): 19: Success. Sinis chooses Stun Location.
Sinis: Location: 3: Right Leg: Damage: 1d6+1d2: 6 HP: Serious Wound.
Theseus: Endurance (43): 14: Success. Theseus loses in the opposed roll. He falls prone.
Theseus now has a Formidable difficulty while fighting. This does not bode well…

The fight goes on, and Sinis, quickly finds lands a blow on Theseus’ right leg, almost smashing it. The pain is excruciating, and Theseus falls down on his knees. Trying to fight with only one good leg.

Round 5:

Sinis Turn 1:

Sinis attacks Theseus, spending 1 AP. Theseus will only Parry re-actively. He intends to use the extra AP to gain the upper hand if required.
Sinis: Combat Style (67): 55: Success.
Theseus: Combat Style (37): 78: Failure.
Q: Does Sinis Compel Surrender?
A: No
Sinis chooses Stun Location.
Sinis: Location: 6: Right Leg: Damage: 1d6+1d2: 3 HP: Minor Wound.
Theseus: Endurance (43): 77: Failure. Theseus loses in the opposed roll. His leg is stunned. Though he’s already prone.

Theseus Turn 1:

Theseus attacks Sinis, spending 1 AP. Sinis will only Parry re-actively. He intends to use the extra AP to gain the upper hand if required.
Theseus: Combat Style (37): 23: Success.
Sinis: Combat Style (67): 05: Critical Success. Sinis deflects all damage and chooses Overextend Opponent.

Sinis Turn 2:

Sinis attacks Theseus, spending 1 AP. Theseus will only Parry re-actively. He intends to use the extra AP to gain the upper hand if required.
Sinis: Combat Style (67): 96: Failure.

Theseus Turn 2:

Theseus can’t attack this Turn.

Theseus Turn 3:

Theseus attacks Sinis, spending 1 AP. Sinis has no AP left.
Theseus: Combat Style (37): 37: Success. Theseus chooses Maximize Damage
Theseus: Location: 18: Left Arm: Damage: 8+1d2: 9 HP: Major Wound.
Sinis: Endurance (36): 97: Failure. He falls down in agony, incapacitated.

Theseus tries to fight, on one leg. The pine bender, smiling at the upcoming fate of the hero. He swings his club again, and smashes at Theseus’ other leg, hitting a nerve so hard, that Theseus again loses control and falls down. Theseus swings back, from the ground, but Sinis, easily jumps back and avoids the strike. The distance is too great for Theseus to catch up to his opponent, but he persists.
As Sinis nears from the other side, Theseus quickly rolls on his back and uses his momentum to bring an unbelievable strike with his iron club directly to SInis’ left arm. The hit is so strong, that Sinis is taken aback, his arm maimed and mangled. All the bones shattered and protruding from the skin, blood flowing everywhere. He screams in pain and falls down crying.

Theseus: First Aid (43) – Right Leg: 86: Failure.
Theseus: First Aid (43) – Left Leg: 93: Failure
Theseus: Healing (29) – Left Leg: 11: Success: Heals 1d3 HP: 2 HP. The injury is now a Minor Wound.

Theseus tries to bandage the bruises on his legs using some herbs to soothe the pain, but he can’t find anything that will help him. Instead he knows that what he has to do will hurt. One of the leg bones is slightly out of place. He grits his teeth, and with the help of some leverage, he puts it back into position, screaming in agony.
He has regained control of his legs, and he feels much more confident now.

Theseus tries to bring down the pine tree.
Theseus: Brawn (58): 89: Failure.
Q: Does he have a rope with him?
A: Yes
Theseus uses the rope to bring down the pine tree.
Theseus: Brawn (82): 39: Success. He bends the pine tree with the help of the rope.
Theseus lifts Sinis to put him on the pine tree. Theseus STR: 16, Sinis SIZ: 15, he can lift him.
Theseus lets go of the bent pine tree,catapulting Sinis to his death.

“You shall plague this land no longer Sinis.” Theseus sais to the incapacitated robber who cannot find the strength to speak, just cry in pain.
At first Theseus tries to grab the tree just as Sinis had, but he lacks the size of the towering man.
Instead, he uses a length of rope to grab well to the branch, and lowers it down with extreme difficulty, until its almost flat on the ground, and ties the rope well to the next tree so that the pine doesn’t move. Then he lifts up the robber and places him on the pine tree. He looks at Theseus almost pleading, but the young man is adamant. With a quick release of the rope knot, the robber is launched in the air, meeting his fate.


Perigune

Q: Is the scene as in the Myth?
A: Yes
Theseus: Perception (39): 42: Failure

Theseus was told about Sinis’ daughter, the beautiful Perigune (Περιγούνη) and starts looking for her. He cries out her name, but she has hidden well in the foliage.
“Show yourself lady. I will not hurt you. Your father was an evil man and met his end as he should. You were not part of his plan.” Theseus cries out to her.

Theseus: Influence (64): 63: Success.

Theseus hears a sigh of relief, and goes to the sound, to see Perigune lying in a bed of rushes and asparagus. She is praying and talking to the the brushwood shrubs and the asparagus thorns to give her shelter and vows to them that if she’s unharmed she won’t cut them down or burn them.
“Do not be afraid.” He tells her.
Perigune cries. Theseus can’t tell if it was because she feels relieved that a deceitful despot like her father is no more, or because of the stress of the combat and the screams she heard. He doubts that it’s because of loss. Because as she sees Theseus she finds comfort in his arms.
The next few days Theseus spends them with her, and she helps tend his wounds. In due time she will bear him a son.


Session Background: That was really close! Theseus failed roll after roll against Sinis. In the end, I was rolling just to see how the hero will perish. Thankfully in the last moment Theseus managed to come on top.
I need to learn a bit more about how tactics work in Mythras, because otherwise it’s going to be very risky. I had to spend both my Luck Points in the first round of combat.
It may feel that Sinis should have used a different set of special effects, but it was my understanding that this villain drew pleasure from the screams of the hapless live victims that were thrown afar from the trees. He didn’t want to kill Theseus, he wanted to stun him, and catapult him like all the others before him.
I wanted to try a more roleplaying approach instead of combat again, but the dice didn’t help, so this entire session was essentially their fight, and a short scene with Sinis’ daughter. Not much to roleplay there. Just kept the initial myth story, as the Oracle answered and the game mechanics assisted.
Also I’ve noticed that I forgot to add the base bonuses in the Professional Skills of Theseus. I will update the pt1 as needed.
Another thing I noticed about soloing in Mythras is that there is an extra metagaming issue to deal with. Special Effects. If you know what the opponent will do you can prepare a counter, which is a problem when playing both the protagonist and the opponent. For now I will try to keep these to a minimum. Maybe add a mechanic like Deceit/Insight to see if I’m allowed to use them.
Finally, regarding the use of the Myth as a prewritten adventure I find myself having trouble deciphering everything. What does ‘Is the scene as in the myth?’ mean. So far I have interpreted it as the initial setup. But I also interpreted that events depicted in the myth are easier, or more likely to succeed. For example in the scene with Perigune I gave Theseus a Very Easy modifier, because the myth stated that when she heard that she wouldn’t be harmed she got out of hiding. Maybe in the future I should ask some more metagaming questions to fill in the gaps that are not answered by the myth. If this was a prewritten module, for example, it might state a completely different difficulty, for any reason. Something to keep in mind.